Hungarian Academy of Sciences    
Section of Mathematics
(Mathematical Sciences Section)
.
presents
.
The János Bolyai International Mathematical Prize



History of the Prize
Founding Letter
Committee

Awardees:
Henri Poincaré (1905)

David Hilbert (1910)

Saharon Shelah
for Cardinal Arithmetic (2000), photos of the Prize celebration, Laudatio from Miklós Laczkovich

Misha Gromov
for Metric structures for Riemannian and non-Riemannian spaces
(2005), videoarchive of the Prize celebration, program of the celebration, Laudatio from László Lovász, The Mathematics of Misha Gromov by Gábor Elek

Yuri I. Manin for Frobenius manifolds, quantum cohomology, and moduli spaces (2010), the celebration will take place in the Ceremonial Hall of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Rooselvelt tér 9, 1051-Hungary on December 1, 2010 at 14:00. Program:

Part 1) Presentation of the 2010 János Bolyai International Mathematical Prize
2:00 pm Opening by Domokos Szász, President of the Section for Mathematics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

2:05 pm Welcome by József Pálinkás, President of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

2:10 pm Welcome by László Lovász, President of International Union of Mathematics

2:15 pm Welcome by Mireille Martin-Deschamps, member of the European Mathematical Society Executive committee, elected Vice-President starting from January 1, 2011

2:20 pm Report of the International Prize Committee and Laudatio by Tibor Krisztin, Secretary of the Committee

2:30 pm Presentation of the Prize by József Pálinkás

2:35 pm                          Break

Part 2) Lectures of the 2010 Bolyai and Fields Medal Laureates

3:00 pm Infinities in Quantum Field Theory and in Classical Computing: Renormalization Program by Yuri I. Manin

3:45 pm Introduction of Stanislav Smirnov by Bálint Tóth

3:50 pm Discrete Complex Analysis and Probability by Stanislav Smirnov

4:35 pm Closing by Domokos Szász



Photos of the function
     
   
     

3-minute history of the Bolyai Prize (wmv video clip)

Professor Manin's lecture

Professor Smirnov's lecture